hive and warehouse

Miss Lovely Eyes 1930s

Miss Lovely Eyes 1930s

The Song of the Demented Priest


I put those things there.—See them burn.
The emerald the azure and the gold
Hiss and crack, the blues & greens of the world
As if I were tired. Someone interferes
Everywhere with me. The clouds, the clouds are torn
In ways I do not understand or love.

Licking my long lips, I looked upon God
And he flamed and he was friendlier
Than you were, and he was small. Showing me
Serpents and thin flowers; these were cold.
Dominion waved & glittered like the flare
From ice under a small sun. I wonder.

Afterward the violent and formal dancers
Came out, shaking their pithless heads.
I would instruct them but I cannot now,—
Because of the elements. They rise and move,
I nod a dance and they dance in the rain
In my red coat. I am the king of the dead.



by John Berryman

Is There a Way to Sleep This Season Off? by Rachel Milligan


He put salt water in. He put the

smallest sound inside my stomach in.

He put the mosquito netting in.

He smeared attar on

my neck. He put dalmatian

chrysanthemums in. He put

conversation with a widow in

the hour without stopping.

He put a hollowed out tree trunk

in the bookshelf in

the middle of the night.

He put the unintelligible drag

in a fistful of grass in

the purple river light in

the expat coffee shop.

The building we broke

into was in. He put the muddy handful

of pearls in the promise

of a house. He put a mulberry

in, a tiny worm. He put

the wall in the rain

walking home. He

did not put bedsheets in. He

never put the bottle in. He

did not, would not come to the house.

He did not mar me with rain.



from The Philadelphia Review of Books

‘Twas just this time, last year, I died.

—Emily Dickinson, from “[445]” (via proustitute)

Mayall, J.E., Doctor and suspended patient, 1877, Woodburytype George Eastman House Museum Collection

Mayall, J.E., Doctor and suspended patient, 1877, Woodburytype
George Eastman House Museum Collection

Catskill 2014

Catskill 2014

This weekend is the Popsickle Festival in DUMBO! I’m on at 3pm on Saturday at The Forgotten Works studio on 46 Bridge Street. 

This weekend is the Popsickle Festival in DUMBO! I’m on at 3pm on Saturday at The Forgotten Works studio on 46 Bridge Street. 

believermag:

Drawing by Josephine Demme
Fiction Seminar
Ben Marcus
Technologies of Heartbreak 
This seminar will examine how emotion is attempted and transmitted in fiction, the various ways readers are captured and made to care about a story.  Emotional effects—rapture, sympathy, desire, empathy, fascination, grief, repulsion—will be considered as techniques of language, enabled or muted by narrative context, acoustics, phrasing, and our own predispositions.  How can a sentence, a phrase, a paragraph cause us to feel things, and is a high degree of feeling akin to “liking” a book?  What is it to care about a character or the progress of a story, and how was that care installed in us?  What are the various kinds and sequences of sentences that, when placed in a narrative, can produce emotional engagement in a reader, affection or distraction, or is it impossible to isolate our reaction to a book in terms of its language?  The focus will be on some rhetorical strategies novelists and story writers have used to impart feeling, among them: concealment, indirection, revelation, confession, flat affect, irony, hyperbole, repetition, sentimentality, elusiveness, and sincerity.  A tentative book list follows. 
2/4 - Revolutionary Road - Richard Yates
2/11 - Mrs. Bridge - Evan S. Connell
2/18 - Everything That Rises Must Converge - Flannery O’Connor2/25 - A Personal Matter - Kenzabarō Ōe
3/1 - Jernigan - David Gates3/4  - Housekeeping - Marilynne Robinson
3/11 - The Emigrants - W. G. Sebald3/25 -  Winesburg, Ohio - Sherwood Anderson 
4/1 - Blood Meridian - Cormac McCarthy
4/8 - The Fifth Child - Doris Lessing
4/22 - Two Serious Ladies - Jane Bowles
4/29 - The Sheltering Sky - Paul Bowles
5/6 - Correction - Thomas Bernhard
See an interview with Ben Marcus about the syllabus.

believermag:

Drawing by Josephine Demme

Fiction Seminar

Ben Marcus

Technologies of Heartbreak 

This seminar will examine how emotion is attempted and transmitted in fiction, the various ways readers are captured and made to care about a story.  Emotional effects—rapture, sympathy, desire, empathy, fascination, grief, repulsion—will be considered as techniques of language, enabled or muted by narrative context, acoustics, phrasing, and our own predispositions.  How can a sentence, a phrase, a paragraph cause us to feel things, and is a high degree of feeling akin to “liking” a book?  What is it to care about a character or the progress of a story, and how was that care installed in us?  What are the various kinds and sequences of sentences that, when placed in a narrative, can produce emotional engagement in a reader, affection or distraction, or is it impossible to isolate our reaction to a book in terms of its language?  The focus will be on some rhetorical strategies novelists and story writers have used to impart feeling, among them: concealment, indirection, revelation, confession, flat affect, irony, hyperbole, repetition, sentimentality, elusiveness, and sincerity.  A tentative book list follows. 

2/4 - Revolutionary Road - Richard Yates

2/11 - Mrs. Bridge - Evan S. Connell

2/18 - Everything That Rises Must Converge - Flannery O’Connor

2/25 - A Personal Matter - Kenzabarō Ōe

3/1 - Jernigan - David Gates

3/4  - Housekeeping - Marilynne Robinson

3/11 - The Emigrants - W. G. Sebald

3/25 -  Winesburg, Ohio - Sherwood Anderson 

4/1 - Blood Meridian - Cormac McCarthy

4/8 - The Fifth Child - Doris Lessing

4/22 - Two Serious Ladies - Jane Bowles

4/29 - The Sheltering Sky - Paul Bowles

5/6 - Correction - Thomas Bernhard

See an interview with Ben Marcus about the syllabus.

Photo of Fred Wilson’s “The Greek Slave” at the Brooklyn Museum 

Photo of Fred Wilson’s “The Greek Slave” at the Brooklyn Museum